JPO Java Picture Organizer
Screenshot of JPO
Introduction

JPO is a program that helps you organise your digital pictures by putting them in collections. There you can browse the pictures, skip through the thumbnails, share them by email or upload to Google Picasa. A powerful picture viewer allows you to see the pictures full screen with simple Zoom-in and Zoom-out with the left and right mouse buttons.

A fundamental design principle is that JPO doesn't mess with your pictures. They stay unchanged on your disk unless you ask JPO to move them somewhere or to delete them.

JPO is not a photo editing application. There are many excellent packages out there with which you can touch up your pictures. You can make JPO open such a program for you.

Richard Eigenmann from Zürich has spent the last 14 years building and improving JPO as an OpenSource project. He hopes you will find it useful and enjoys feedback.


Features
  • Quickly Organize digital images into collections and groups
  • Creates web pages from your collection
  • Can upload to Google's Picasa (TM)
  • Download pictures from Camera with the ability to load only the new ones
  • Send rescaled images and originals via email
  • View pictures as a slide show
  • Simple zoom-in and zoom-out with left / right mouse buttons
  • Rotation on the fly without modifying the original image
  • Browse image thumbnails
  • Automatically advancing slide shows
  • Captures metadata and has search features
  • Displays EXIF and IPTC metadata
  • Export to directory facility to share via e-mail or CD-ROM
  • Open XML data structures
  • Pure Java, no native libraries
  • Runs on Windows, Linux and Mac OS, anywhere Java runs
  • Can call up outside applications
  • Leaves your pictures where they are
  • Can move pictures to new locations to tidy up
  • Doesn't modify your original pictures
  • Open source license

What's that scary Java error?
Java Scary Error

The latest versions of Java seem to be defaulting to ultra paranoid security settings. This might be a good thing but it can stop you from running JPO with Java Web Start. JPO does need to read the pictures on your filesystem and does need to write to your disk as that pretty much is the point of a software to organise your pictures. As such it can't run in the Java Sandbox and needs the "all" permission. I have self-signed the application that I upload to Sourceforge. Obviously that is not a world-trusted key so you need to consider if you can trust me.

I can assure you that JPO doesn't "phone home", doesn't spy on you, doesn't send spam and doesn't try to sell you anything. Better than that, it's open source software so you can go and read the 53'534 lines of code (23.3.2014) and compile your own version!

If you like the convenience of the pre-packaged Java Web Start bundles then you need to go to your Java installation (Start > Control Panel > Java) and reduce the security setting to something less paranoid and accept the risk.


Screenshots

The Thumbnail Browser:

Screenshot of JPO

The slide show window:

Screenshot of JPO
Reviews

I was totally amazed when I discovered that people were writing reviews about JPO and positive reviews at that!

The Agfanet review is no longer online but an archived version can be read here.


Technical description

The Java Picture Organizer application is a platform independent image organisation tool that lets a user build collections of images that they can then search, browse, show and share with others. An HTML export facility is available that allows web pages to be built from collections. JPO uses an open XML file format to store collection information. Picture groups can be exported to a directory for CD burning and sharing by other means. JPO supports all picture formats of your Java installation. By default this is JPEG and GIF. The application makes use of Sun's Java Web Start (TM) technology for easy installation and upgrading.


Do you like JPO?>

Why don't you let the author know? Send him an encouraging email at richard.eigenmann@gmail.com


Last update to this page: 23 Mar 2014
Copyright 2003-2014 by Richard Eigenmann, Zürich, Switzerland